Watchdog: Nerve agent, toxic chemical "very likely" used in Syria attacks

Watchdog: Nerve agent, toxic chemical  "very likely" used in Syria attacks


A protection mask is pictured at the OPCW (The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons) headquarters in The Hague, The Netherlands, on April 20, 2017.



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The global chemical weapons watchdog says the nerve agent sarin and toxic chemical chlorine were "very likely" used as weapons in two attacks in central Syria in late March 2017. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons said Wednesday that its Fact-Finding Mission probing alleged attacks in Syria found that "sarin was very likely used as a chemical weapon in the south of Ltamenah" in Hama province on March 24 and that chlorine was very likely used a day later at and near Ltamenah Hospital.


"The conclusions for the 24 March and 25 March incidents are based on separate witness testimony, epidemiological analysis and environmental samples," OPCW said Wednesday in a news release. "The collection of information and material, interviewing witnesses, as well as analysis of samples required a longer period of time to draw conclusions."


The OPCW's fact-finding team is not mandated to apportion blame for chemical attacks.   


This is a developing story and will be updated.



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